Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Could someone please turn the heat on!

Boy there has been a lot going on since the last post. The Grebe situation here in Utah is getting a lot of attention because of the way it was handled. Even the New York Times ran an article about it. Author Suzie Gilbert also posted about it on her blog, the Crooked Wing. Hopefully, not holding my breath, policies will be created to handle a similar situation in the future.


So as to NOT overload myself, I'm just going to post one or two new situations or updates and then do this again in a few days.

So I had posted about a new Golden eagle that had come in with obvious lead poisoning symptoms. We treated her as a precaution as it was going to be a few days before getting her into our vet, so time was of the essence. We named her Spirit. What an amazing girl. With a great deal of time and patience on both our parts, she is recovering well. It was a long, concerning ordeal as she could not stand due to her feet, but we continued her supportive care, force feeding her until she would take it from us willingly. We still had to hold her for these
feedings, again, because she could not stand. She gradually began putting on much needed weight and became fully hydrated from the subcutaneous fluids we were giving her, helping her kidneys. We took her back into our vets to rerun her blood work. Strangely, some of her results are still concerning.
Watching her, now out in the eagle flight, flying around, eating on her own, going here and there, it just doesn't fit with the blood tests. Our vet, although concerned, agreed we need to base what we are doing on what we are seeing and with our remote cameras in the flight on all the time, I can peek in and watch her and the other eagles at any given time (except in the dark). We are certainly keeping a concerned eye on her, but things look good right now.

Copper, another Golden eagle we have posted about, finally got to have his pins and fixator removed here just over a week ago.
Sadly, during the removal surgery, our vet noticed that the wing with all the damage and lead shot dispersed throughout the entire wing, had a portion of the wing dying due to one of the pieces of lead. It was compromising the blood supply to another portion of that wing. Nothing could be done and a few days after that surgery, the dying portion of that wing, fell off.
Now, Copper is not releasable. Copper's lead poisoning is also under control. His was primary, unlike Spirit's, who's is secondary. Regardless, the effect of lead out in the environment from ammunition, whether directly into the body or in bodies of animals left after being shot with lead,
is lethal in most cases as most of it's victims are not found in time.
















As I said, I will update again in a few days with more Great Horned owls and yes, another Golden eagle. We also now have a Great Blue Heron with us, so much more is coming.
Debbie..............

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Feathered brothers and sisters, you came to us broken and as you bled…….we saw you desperate, dehydrated, desiccated, diseased, distressed, emaciated, famished, frayed, frightened, helpless, hungry, ragged, ravenous, shaken, shocked, shot, sickly, stressed, stunned, tattered, thirsty, traumatized, torn, weary and wounded. Defiantly, you stood us off with your last breath as we tried to tend to you. We saw you come in as cute, naked, fuzzy, cuddly youth, as mischievous, defiant adolescents, as fierce, regal rulers of the sky and as cunning, maimed elders whose time on earth was almost done. You endeared yourselves to us, bit us, charmed us, footed us, delighted us, hissed at us, talked to us, mantled at us, and graced us with your presence.

Some of you mended and were able to go on your way, never looking back. Some of you were injured in ways that prevented you from going, so you stayed with us to teach us…….And we came to love you. Others were too far gone, and you went home - where you fly free from pain with the Great One. All of you have touched us, and we are changed because of you.

used with permission by Arlene Powers